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Social Innovation

Social Innovation Ecosystem


Social challenges
No doubt that the environment surrounding our society is rapidly changing, not to mention climate change, aging, energy problems, or food, and due to the evolution of our lifestyle, social structure and institutions are evolving. Several questionsare ask the question: is this adaptation moving towards “right” direction? What social value are we seeking today? How to balance these different pressures and constraints? Should our society seek for sustainability for its development? All what we need is to contemplate how to overcome Social Challenges by using knowledge and skills wisely.
Social entrepreneur
A social entrepreneur is someone who seeks to create systemic changes and sustainable improvements thinking about maximising the impact, assesses success in terms of the impact s/he has on society. Social entrepreneurs act as the change agents for society, seizing opportunities others miss and improving systems, inventing new approaches, and creating solutions to change society for the better.
Social Innovation
Social innovation is a novel solution to social problems that is more effective, efficient, sustainable, or fairer than current solutions. The value created accrues primarily to society but also to individuals. Experiences shown that, the most difficult social problems can’t be fully understood and solved, without the involvement of all societal forces: the nonprofit, public, and private sectors. All are now cemented into one block, AKA the development stakeholders. We at SOCIAL INNOVATION EXPERT observe how cross-sector fertilization underlies the three key mechanisms that are driving contemporary social innovation:
• Exchange of ideas and values
• Shifts in roles and relationships
• Integration of private capital with public and philanthropic support
We envision a networked community of leaders actively working across sectors, frontiers, and disciplines to build a more just, sustainable, and prosperous world.We act accordingly to develop new solutions, new frameworks and new platforms for developing individual and organizations.

BUSINESS INNOVATION SERVICES
Organizations who achieved major economic shifts in the late 90's, jumped head first into innovation in one form or another in order to survive. Now, organizations can’t expect to survive without constant innovation.Our main innovations fostering services are :-
• Business Innovation creation & management
• Innovation for Governmental organizations
• Innovation for creating value and growth for organizations
• Secondary Research Services & Support
• Entrepreneurship & innovation Curriculum Development Support

SOCIAL INNOVATION LABs (SILs®)
1- ISLAMIC ECONOMY
LAB N#12: SOCIAL FINANCE & IMPACT INVESTMENT LAB
LAB N#18: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR WAQF DEVELOPMENT
LAB N#17: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR ZAKAT DEPLOYMENT
LAB N#15: DESIGN CSR INITIATIVE FOR CORPORATES & NON-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONs.
LAB N#15: DESIGN EMPOWERING INITIATIVE FOR REFUGEES.

2- POVERTY:
LAB N#3: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR POVERTY ALLEVIATION
LAB N#4: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR JOB CREATION & EMPOWERING YOUTH
LAB N#5: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR TOURISM & TRADITIONAL HANDMADE INDUSTRIES
LAB N#13: DESIGN VALUE CHAIN DEVELOPMENT FOR NON-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS
LAB N#14: GROWTH LAB FOR SOCIAL BUSINESS & NON-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

3- EDUCATION & CULTURAL & ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY
LAB N#6: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR EDUCATION
LAB N#7: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
LAB N#16: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR CULTURAL  HERITAGE
LAB N#11: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR CULTURE & ARTS
LAB N#17: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR SUSTAINABLE ECO-TOURISM
LAB N#8: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR ENVIRONMENTAL AND WEST MANAGEMENT

4- INNOVATION
LAB N#1: BASICS OF SOCIAL INNOVATION
LAB N#2: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR CREATING A SUCCESSFUL SOCIAL BUSINES
LAB N#9: BUSINESS INNOVATION LAB FOR NON-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS SUSTANABILITY

5- GOVERNMENTAL INNOVATION
LAB N#19: 5- GOVERNMENTAL INNOVATION LAB



M&SME ISLAMIC BANKING

knowledge center

Social innovation labs packages

SOCIAL INNOVATION LABS CATALOGUE
N#1: BASICS OF SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB

The learning processwe’re proposing consists of several programs whichcan be either integrated together or stand alone as distinct courses. The whole philosophy is to reach certain knowledge and know-how in managing the social innovation either its social business model or non-for-profit organizations model or even for research purposes. The suggested LABS are presented in the coming pages. All the suggested LABS are programed to be delivered over 2, 3 and 5 days.

N#1: BASICS OFSOCIAL INNOVATION LAB
The growth of modern economic systems has generated more numerous, complex and urgent social challenges. In his speech at Harvard in June 2007,Bill Gates, the founder of Microsoft, said “we can make market forces work better for the poor if we develop a more creative capitalism – if we can stretch the reach of market forces so that more people can make a profit, or at least a living, serving people who are suffering from the worst inequities”. Today, there is a growing consensus that the disconnection between economic growth and social welfare is increasing. Growth does not automatically lead to social welfare anymore, or not as much as it used to be. Social challenges and problems are growing everywhere.
Social innovation attempts to applyinnovation and ideation tools and concepts to such social challenges. Social innovation refers to a group of strategies, concepts, ideas and organizational patterns with a view to expand and strengthen the role of civil society in response to the diversity of social needs (education, culture, health). The term covers, inter alia: new products and services, new organizational patterns (e.g. management methods, work organization), new institutional forms (e.g. mechanisms of power distribution by assignment, positive discrimination quotas), new roles and new functions, or new coordinating and governance mechanisms, OECD, 2011.
The suggested SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB will provide the opportunity to focus on product and innovations that impact communities and improve people’s lives. The Social Innovation Lab focuses on four phases:
• Uncover – participants will uncover and analyze a problem to truly understand the challenge.
• Ideate – participants will utilize the insights of peers, mentors, innovator-in-residence, and high school students to accelerate possible solutions and ideas.
• Prototype – participants will transform ideas into reality, by designing and testing early prototypes, soliciting stakeholder input, and evolving iteratively.
• Launch – each participant pitches their ideas and solutions with the intent of attracting support to help turn their ideas into the next social investments.

LAB N#2: CREATING A SUCCESSFUL SOCIAL BUSINESS
LAB N#3: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR POVERTY ALLEVIATION

LAB N#2: CREATING A SUCCESSFUL SOCIAL BUSINESS The concept of ‘social business, although becoming more popular, is still much less common than the concept of ‘social economy’ and more recently, social and solidarity economy. Social economy is an old concept appeared in the 19th century, strongly influenced by utopian socialism, labour and Social Catholicism movements. The social economy is recognized as a set of economic organizations operating under a few key principles such as primacy of service over financial profit, democratic governance involving members/employees or restrictions regarding the redistribution of profit. Such values represent a third sector emphasizing participative governance and a non-profit orientation which makes it different from both the capitalist for profit sector that relies upon the corporate governance and from the public sector and public governance. From the late 1990s, the concept of social economy was challenged by the concept of ‘social business‘ which progressively evolved into an integrated concept of ‘social and solidarity economy’ incorporating also organizations such as work integration enterprises, fair-trade organizations or even some typical companies on the perimeter of the social and solidarity economy. In 2008, the OECD provided a definition for social business as “Social enterprises are not-for-profit private organizations providing goods or services directly related to their explicit aim to benefit the community. They rely on a collective dynamics involving various types of stakeholders in their governing bodies, they place a high value on their autonomy and they bear economic The objective of this LAB is to enable participants to understand and master the key issues, challenges of setting up a social enterprise – or changing an organization from a charity, public sector or private business into a successful social enterprise. More, the LAB is designed to provide for those who want to start a social enterprise, a unique and comprehensive tool supporting then on their journey. This program will help them starting and operating successfully during their startup phase and provide necessary knowledge and know-how to grow and sustain.

LAB N#3: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR POVERTY ALLEVIATION The approaches used by governments in most of the developed world are still enable to eradicate the poverty. Their policies vary between little preventive (helping individuals from becoming poor), or little alleviative (assisting individuals to reduce their poverty). Some measure are even punitive (providing the assumption that poverty is the poor’s fault). But practically no one is trying curative measures to attempts to “cure” the causes of poverty. More, the increasing emphasis on the private sector in the process of welfare reform has also led to a renewed role for the traditional non-profit sector. The emergence of new organizational forms, such as social enterprises, which combine a social focus with business-like ventures21, alongside the more recognizable forms of co-operatives, associations and charities, has created a new dynamic within the non-profit sector. These new entities have emerged in response to the broad changes that have taken place in social assistance policies and the growing focus on active social policies. As a result of these changes terms, for example „social economy‟ and „Third Sector‟, have come into use to recognize and highlight the way in which the new organizations operate in the space between the State and the market. Those new organizations are now coming to focus on empowering needy individuals through skill enhancement and unlashing their potential as the way to encourage them to get out of poverty. For more than 30 years microfinance has been portrayed as a key policy and program interventionfor poverty reduction and ‘bottom-up’local economic and social development. In the past thirty years, microcredit has spread to every continent and benefited over 100 million families. However,Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus was not satisfied and declared that we dreamed to creating a World Without Poverty. Much more could be done in case we apply the dynamics of business to humanity's greatest challenges. Prof Yunus goes beyond microcredit to pioneer the idea of social business a completely new way to use the creative vibrancy of business to tackle social problems and particularly poverty.
THE SOCIAL BUSINESS LAB FOR POVERTY ALLEVIATION is expected to generate several social business ideas responding to communities’ most pressing challenges, placing particular attention on youth and women needs, as well as raising awareness on social entrepreneurship and deepen linkages between creative youth and the business community. The Lab will also connect entrepreneurial youth with the other business organization in the country, to provide alternative support and financing through innovative partnerships.

LAB N#4: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR JOB CREATION & EMPOWERING YOUTH
LAB N#5: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR TOURISM & TRADITIONAL HANDMADE INDUSTRIES

LAB N#4: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR JOB CREATION & EMPOWERING YOUTH Youth, account today for approximately one to two-thirds of the population in the world depending on the region. Presently, youth face multiple daunting challenge: securing decent employment in an economic context characterized by a lack of job opportunities. In addition to range of issues further exacerbate them such as: the low demand for labor in some economies especially in rural areas, including the limited work experience, insufficient educational outcomesand lack of skills added to many other issues. Youth unemployment challenge become a globalized phenomenon, whichhas been prioritized by allgovernments intheir national development agendas. However,just the once it comes to implement concrete actions, governments are less efficient or even more demonstrator than doer. Unfortunately, in many countries and supported by international donors, the most significant result of youth development program, beside policy level, were in raising awareness on the importance of empowering them. But not a single government was able to control the youth employment problem. Social business concepts however, implemented on ground in several regions have proven their efficiency to implement real innovative impacting solutions. More, social enterprises are perverse. They deliberately choose to locate in challenging areas and are three times more likely to be based in an area of multiple disadvantage and high unemployment than their private sector equivalent, according to the Social Enterprise UK 2011 survey. In addition, relative to a similar sized private firm they employ more people.
SOCIAL BUSINESS LAB FOR JOB CREATION & EMPOWERING YOUTH is designed to generate several social business ideas responding to youth job creation challenges in your particular community. These social businesses will aim to empower youth through the provision of skills training and a comprehensive job creation techniques, foster an enabling a supporting infrastructure environment by creating web-based platforms and Apps improving the information gap on the labor market supply and demand concerning youth and fresh graduates, and many other ideas. The LAB will focus on how to createsustainable social business solutions that able to empowering youth in order to unleash their potential either for job or business opportunities identification.

LAB N#5: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR TOURISM & TRADITION HANDMADE INDUSTRIES Tourism is one of the world’s largest industries, generating an estimated 11%1 of global Gross Domestic Product (GDP), employing 200 million people and transporting nearly 700 million international travellers per year – a figure that is expected to double by 2020. Developing countries currently have only a minority share of the international tourism market (approximately 30%) but this is growing. International tourism arrivals in developing countries have grown by an average of 9.5% per year since 1990, compared to 4.6% worldwide. The tourism industry makes important contributions to the economies of developing countries, particularly to foreign exchange earnings, employment, and GDP. Tourism is clearly of great significance to developing countries. But is it important in those countries with the highest proportion of poor people? The small island economies which are most dependent on tourism tend to be middle income and contain few of the worlds’ poor. Nevertheless, analysis of tourism data shows that in most countries with high levels of poverty, tourism is significant or growing. Tourism is therefore a fact of life for many of the world’s poor. That’s why we designed a LAB focusing on the value creation of social enterprise in tourism industry. The suggested LAB is expected to generate several social business ideas exploiting the local artisanal and handmade traditions and practices in the communities to transformed into sustainable businesses. Many social businesses in the world are in the process of launching a lifestyle brand dedicated to helping people find meaning, do good, and save their small corner of the world. All of those social business are sharing thousands of ideas about how you can make a difference in their local communities, online, or in the world at large.

LAB N#6: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR EDUCATION
LAB N#7: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

LAB N#6: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR EDUCATION Education may not always be thought of as an innovative sector but as schools increasingly look to relieve budgetary burdens and provide inspirational education experiences, a new breed of innovative social enterprises are emerging that can help on both counts. New technology is an area that is arguably easier for a small social enterprise to innovate than an entire school or local authority. Hundreds of social businesses launched in the last few years in the world providing innovative education services. Their ideas are beyond classical education techniques, varying from helping children (and teachers) create computer games that teach both digital and social skills, another improving the children creativity by using gaming technology to helps children invent their very own magical animals. Other social businesses can also be found within more traditional educational experiences toprovide extra classes lessons for needy or marginalized (or immigrants) student, or to do teacher training, outdoor learning, vegetable gardening and outdoor experiences for kids and climate change education.Those examples show that social businesses are now shaping the education process worldwide. The BUSINESS LAB FOR EDUCATION is expected to generate several social business ideas exploiting the education challenges in your community. The LAB is designed to provide an extremely inspiring program on the latest trends and practices of the value creation of social enterprise in education industry.

LAB N#7: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY Technology for the sake of technology is a waste of precious resources. Social entrepreneurs need to understand the deep value that ICT can bring to social change when it is offered in context, with appropriate training, and with the intent of empowering the user.” Justin Rattner, President, Intel. Technology can empower social entrepreneurship initiatives by democratizing access to information, creating business value, and enabling new capabilities—although not every technology initiative succeeds. On other hand, social innovations that scale have an explicit focus on generating user value. A consistent feature of any innovation that reaches scale is that it has created value for the user – as determined by that user. This might seem obvious, but this is not about whether the approach will benefit that user – it's whether they'd choose to use it. Creating a level playing field in tech means moving away from portraying the industry as overtly academic and specialized; open only to people with computer science degrees. The fact is that millions of young people are already modifying games, mixing music on YouTube and using Instagram for all sorts of creative projects. Together with the computer science degree student, these are the people who are the future of technology. They have the skills for the new generation of 'creative technologists' who have the ability to make digital products that people like them to want to use and buy. The SOCIAL BUSINESS LAB promoting science & technology will focus on many innovative topics, among which: how to uncover service innovation opportunities to transform social services and socialorganizations, the various innovation approaches to improve developmentprojects outcomes, how to use new technology to improve the life of people in marginalized areas, etc.

LAB N#8: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR ENVIRONMENTAL AND WEST MANAGEMENT
LAB N#9: BUSINESS INNOVATION LAB FOR NON-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

LAB N#8: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR ENVIRONMENTAL AND WEST MANAGEMENT Communities can be transformed by public services that are responsive, innovative and deliver multiple outcomes. Social enterprises – businesses driven by a social and/or environmental mission – have the potential to lead the way in showing how to provide better services for greater public benefit. What is needed for them to set the standard is proper recognition of what they achieve. More, environmentally sustainable practices and innovative solutions need to be introduced to address the serious issue of resource scarcity in many regions in the world. There is an urgent need, therefore, for increased action to combat current environmental degradation such as water scarcity, desertification and waste management. While governmental actions are very insufficient, there is a large room to promote citizen action and support those citizens already working to improve their environments. For example, by recognizing “waste management” as a social problem as well as a resource, the concept of how the social business model can be a helpful business model to eradicate “waste problem” from our society and recover resources for the future of humanity. Social entrepreneurs do not wait for governmental responses to challenges; they know well what is not working in their local communities, and so they implement solutions themselves. Hundreds of social business targeting environmental sustainability issues like waste management and energy conservation strive all over the world to provide the communities with the knowledge, tools and infrastructure necessary to minimize environmental impacts.

LAB N#9: BUSINESS INNOVATION LAB FOR NON-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Recent reports analyzing the sustainability of non-for-profit organizations identified many reasons why shifting from a donor-driven organization to a revenue-producing social enterprise is more beneficial in terms of global impact. By doing so, such organizations may increase their chance of success. Donor retention is a major challenge for non-for-profit organizations. The majority of donors leave after their first gift. A recent study of The Akina Foundation, reported that the average first year donor retention rate is a mere 29.3%. A financially sustainable social enterprise that is not reliant on donor funding has the ability to focus less on fundraising and more on building supportive business models to implement in the long term. More, startup companies are traditionally for-profit enterprises, but in recent years philanthropic ventures have begun adopting the technological know-how and scrappy mentality of startups to develop a new breed of lean nonprofits. Setting proper strategies, design proper programs, firing and training the staff are all factors allows the generation of revenue and growth for any enterprises and same for non-for-profit organizations. but there are consequences of the huge competition and financial fuzziness many communities are suffering from. When nonprofits and funding sources are not well matched, funds don’t flow to the areas where it will do the greatest good. The result is that, frequently, promising programs are cut, curtailed, or never launched. And when dollars become tight, a chaotic fundraising scramble is all the more likely to ensue. To face such challenges, social organizations, either social businesses of non-for-profit organizations must first have a proper business model enabling it being a changemaker to help scale up their activities and their impact. The BUSINESS MODELS LAB FOR NON-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS is focusing on a relatively new concept in the nonprofit world, which is rarely engages in equally clear and succinct conversations about an organization’s long- term sustainability strategy. The LAB will analyze the hidden facts of running a successful. Participants will understand why “running a charitable organization is more complex than running an equivalent size for-profit enterprise”. The new business models developed worldwide for nonprofits are now justifying how all nonprofits are in two businesses: the Business of providing service deliverables and the business of generating operational revenues.

LAB N#10: DESIGN DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS FOR NON-FOR-PROFIT
LAB N#11: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR CULTURE & ARTS

LAB N#10: DESIGN DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS FOR NON-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS It is always difficult to define new things. If we can define,a program is a collection of resources in an organization and is geared to accomplish a certain goal or set of goals. Programs are one major aspect of the non-profit's structure. The typical non-profit organizational structure is built around programs, where it provides certain services, each of which is usually formalized into a program. The major challenge today is to build and implement properly a full loop of elements integrated in the programs taking the shape of value chain. Governments and development agencies increasingly use value chain development as a key element in their development strategies. Frequently such strategies aim at improving the income of poor groups of the society through value addition. For example, pro-poor value chain initiatives often try to overcome entry barriers for poor agricultural producers and providers of inputs and services. Often they make use of lead firms to build up supplier networks among poor and marginalized farmers, helping them gain access to knowledge and production technologies. Participants enrolled in theLabwill be able to developing skill sets for a better design successful development projects and initiatives, wanting to learn to develop projects that solve societal and business challenges of helping in any developmental matter. The Lab will help provide best practices improving in the project management, design and implementation which most of time lay behind the non-achievement of enhancing social services and or community development projects.

LAB N#11: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR CULTURAL & ARTS From the work of nonprofit arts agencies to the impact of cultural tourism, it is clear that the creative sector is important to state economies all across the world. Social enterprise is thriving and rapidly expanding, and the creative sector is one of the fastest growing in many western countries, the cultural and creative sectors make up nearly 4.5% of the European economy, thanks to nearly 1.4 million small and medium-sized businesses employing about 8.5 million people across Europe generating and distributing creative content all over Europe. In UK only– it contributes 6% of GDP and employs over 2 million people. The cultural and creative industry have shown great resilience during the crisis – they actually continued to grow – while stimulating creativity and innovation spill-overs in other sectors.The creative industry in USA is also growing rapidly. In Arkansas, for example, it generates $927 million in personal income for Arkansas citizens, and constitute the state’s third largest employer—after transport and logistics processed foods. In North Carolina, the wages and income of workers employed by creative industries infused $3.9 billion into the state’s economy in 2006. And in Massachusetts, the 17.6% yearly growth of the cultural sector contributed $4.23 billion to the state’s economy.
Also on creative level, social entrepreneurs are changing the creative sector. “If more artistic companies create a business model around social enterprise, the creative sector could become less fragmented and far less reliant on public funding”, Wayne Ingram is founder of Tap The Table Theatre. Most theatre companies are looking to create social change – they make work that reflects society and try to communicate messages they hope will make a difference. For many arts companies it's all about putting on a show, and social change is often a by-product. What the designed LAB will do definitively is to make social change the sole driving force behind what artists do. It has the goal to show the way that how such artistic social business do not have to rely on charitable donations or public funding in the way that charities and other arts companies do. The LAB will provide international experience of the new generation of artistic-based social business who are currently revolutionized the world of cultural.

LAB N#12: SOCIAL FINANCE & IMPACT INVESTMENT LAB
LAB N#13: DESIGN VALUE CHAIN DEVELOPMENT FOR NON-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

LAB N#12: SOCIAL FINANCE & IMPACT INVESTMENT LAB In 2013, global political leadership delivered strong endorsement of the impact investment market. The UK hosted the launch of a Social Impact Investment Task Force alongside the G8 meeting in London confirming engagement across governments in Europe and the US continued with several initiatives launched last year.According to an Impact Economy report, there was over $9bn invested in impact investment globally in 2013. The UK market is growing and there are estimates that it will reach £1bn by 2015.
The impact investment market offers a choice of risk, reward and impact from each investment across the spectrum. Some investments seek to achieve market-rate risk-adjusted financial returns whilst others offer below-market risk-adjusted financial returns in return for the impact created – so-called ‘blended value’ investments. Each opportunity needs to be considered on its own merits and in particular, the specific impact the enterprise seeks to achieve.
The Social Impact Investment Lab is designed to support acquire the know-how in the creation of impact investment structures and the impact investment expertise; provide a global learning exchange to develop and share best practice on collaboration among the investor community players. It will also go across four specialist on impact measurement, asset allocation, mission lock, and international development. The LAB will develop practical informationon the following: Impact-first versus Financial-first, sources of capital, form of investment, SGB life cycle, expected returns, deployment of capital, capacity development organizations, geographic focus, sector or mission focus, segmenting the bop market, urban versus rural focus, for-profit versus nonprofit SGBs, investment time horizon, average size of investment, etc.

LAB N#13: DESIGN VALUE CHAIN DEVELOPMENT FOR NON-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Value chain relies on the basic economic principle of advantage — organizations are best served by operating in sectors where they have a relative productive advantage compared to their competitors. Simultaneously, nonprofit should ask themselves where they can deliver the best value to their stakeholders. A value chain or network model allows nonprofit sector to identify related activities, which should add value to end customers, thereby allowing a nonprofit to achieve a real impact. The documentation, analysis and improvement of the value chain/network can improve nonprofit performance, delivery and benefits to stakeholders. It can serve as a very good starting point for detailed process architecture and design, provide valuable input to debates around changing nonprofit business models, relationships with partners and outsourcing discussions. While nonprofit sector is the fastest growing sector of the world economy, for example it growing almost four times the rate of the U.S. economy since 1970, the sector is still evolving, taking shape within the post-capitalism ear, whereas the challenges confronting it are increasing, ranging from new regulatory pressures to new competition and complex needs of the communities.
To conduct a value chain design LAB, the nonprofit begins by identifying each part of its service process and identifying where steps can be eliminated or improvements can be made. These improvements can result in either cost savings or improved productive capacity. The end result is that stakeholder derive the most benefit from the product for the cheapest cost, which improves the company's bottom line in the long run. This LAB outlines how value based management can be applied to non-profit and non-governmental organizations. It also attempts to highlight the “best practices” for creating value chain initiatives in the nonprofit and to focus efforts and priorities in moving towards higher levels of process standardization.

LAB N#14: GROWTH LAB FOR SOCIAL BUSINESS & NON-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS(“How do we get really big?)
LAB N#15: DESIGN CSR INITIATIVE FOR CORPORATES & NON-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

LAB N#14: GROWTH LAB FOR SOCIAL BUSINESS & NON-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS(“How do we get really big?) Since 1970, more than 200,000 nonprofits have opened in the U.S., but only 144 of them have reached $50 million in annual revenue. Recent study dedicated to understand the growth mechanism of nonprofit organizations shown that most of the members of this elite group got big by doing mainly two things: they raised the bulk of their money from a single type of funder such as corporations or government – and not, as conventional wisdom would recommend.And by going after diverse sources of funding. Just as importantly.These nonprofits created professional organizations that were tailored to the needs of their primary funding sources.Researchers identified several important practices common among nonprofits that succeeded in building large-scale funding models such as they developed funding in one concentrated source rather than across diverse sources; they found a funding source that was a natural match to their mission and beneficiaries; etc. The need to increase its resources, the strategic response to spend more resources on fundraising, the productivity to deliver services, all these topics focusing on the competitive dynamics of the non-profit sector have been the focus of far less research than similar topics in for-profit sectors. Likewise, as the nonprofit sector gains prominence in our overall economy, we should be emphasizing the impact this growth has had on the sector itself, and in particular on organizations ability to attract potentially scarce donation resources. In this LAB, we propose a potential instigator for growth in the nonprofit sector, and discuss the reallocation of donations that occurs with this growth.

LAB N#15: DESIGN CSR INITIATIVE FOR CORPORATES & NON-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS During the World Economic Forum of 2008, Bill Gate spoke of the need for more “creative capitalism”, to create an approach where governments, non-for-profit and businesses work together to stretch the reach of market forces so that more people can make a profit, or gain recognition, doing wok that eases the world’s inequalities and other challenges. More, researchers found that financial benefits of effective strategic corporate social responsibility (CSR) are located in the areas of human resources and talent management, reputation and branding of the companies. As the CSR is taking the world of business by a storm, businesses are now incredibly excited to ensure that their practices, processes, products and procedures are ethical, sustainable and environmentally friendly. In 2011, an estimated US$381 billion was transferred from developed countries to the developing world through philanthropy and private sector investment, a 35% increase from US$281 billion in 2009.
In addition, a stark shift has occurred in how organizations must understand their capabilities in relation to a wide variety of stakeholders. The quality of relationships that a company has with its key stakeholders (customers, investors, suppliers, public and governmental officials, activists, communities, employees, etc.), is crucial to its success. Such major transformations require companies to redesign their business value propositions to better accommodate with surrounding communities’ challenges, in orderto enhance the leadership role on both individual and organizational levels. That’s why we created thee suggested LAB in order to enable participants to develop a variety of strategies for dealing with the current mosaic of societal needs and corresponding business imperatives. The suggested LAB will address several concepts and challenges faced by CSR managers during their day-today work. It provides the needed foundation for the required skills, experiences and managerial know-how.

LAB N#16: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR CULTURAL HERITAGE
LAB N#17: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR SUSTAINABLE ECOTOURISM

LAB N#16: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR CULTURAL HERITAGE Cultural heritage often brings to mind artifacts (paintings, drawings, prints, mosaics, sculptures), historical monuments and buildings, as well as archaeological sites. It includes all evidence of human creativity and expression: photographs, documents, books, manuscripts, and instruments, either as individual objects or as collections. Cultural heritage is alsocontains immaterial elements (intangible heritage) such as traditions, oral history, performing arts, social practices, rituals, etc. Over the last two decades, there has been a growing movement linking arts and cultural assets with the economic development for creating jobs and wealth. In the USA, nonprofit arts and cultural industry generates $134 billion each year, supporting close to 5 million full-time-equivalent jobs, and the direct impact from sales of handmade crafts totals $14 billion. Moreover, the performing of social entrepreneursexploiting cultural-heritage in their organization constitutes one of the fastest growing markets worldwide.Several sectors are crosscutting in the conservation-restoration of cultural heritage either for protection or care of tangible cultural heritage, including artworks, architecture, archaeology, and museum collections. Conservation activities include preventive conservation, examination, documentation, research, treatment, and education. More, arts and cultural development sectors are largely “place-based” and celebrate the heritage, history, and landscapes of a place in ways that emphasize the unique features of communities. Presently many organizations and social entrepreneurs stared initiatives preserving, protecting and exploiting the cultural heritage resources management.
The suggested LAB will enable participants to develop a vision on the different opportunities presented by their cultural heritage resources. It will present the challenges faced by the cultural heritage, which should be transformed into opportunity by social entrepreneurs to build a globally competitive creative economy in their community. How some social enterprises can develop required high-level proficiencies in creativity, design, communicating with others, and seeing the big picture of the social and economic impact of cultural heritage resources?

LAB N#17: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB FOR SUSTAINABLE ECOTOURISM Communities and destinations known for their tourism activities are facing the challenge of ensuring the protection of natural environments and socio-cultural heritage, while building livelihoods on revenues from tourism activities. However, ecotourism is defined as "responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment, sustains the well-being of the local people, and involves interpretation and education". Ecotourism, as defined, requires an understanding of sustainability, as a focus for continuing improvement. Some definitions of sustainable development considered it as development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. As the number of tourists seeking to experience local culture continues to grow, it creating a growing trend towards sustainable tourism that is community-based. Such phenomena helped the community economic development to become one common response to economic hardships in countries around the world. Consequently, increasingly, tourism is being used as a tool to aid in economic development or restructuring processes. The growing importance of experiential tourism (including nature, culture, and soft adventure) has further heightened the popularity of areas endowed with natural beauty and diverse cultures. The suggested LAB will rise many questions such as: what is eco-tourism and how should it be considered within your community context?What are the current and potential key factors affecting tourism in your community that need to be examined?How to identify and examine the factors that enable and inhibit eco-tourism development in your community.Can an eco-tourism sustainability framework be created for your community using social business concepts?





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Designed SOCIAL INNOVATION & BUSINESS LABs-en.pdf